3 Tips To Consider When Buying a Pink Product

Photo by srqpix
10.09.2012By

Photo by srqpix

pink – wink. trans vb. 1. To deceive consumers that buying a pink product will support a breast cancer charity. Common during Breast Cancer Awareness Month in October.

This pink coffee mug from Dutch Brothers Coffee says it all: Be Aware.

It’s Breast Cancer Awareness Month, or Pinktober, which for many years has been illuminating the challenges faced by millions of women with breast cancer.

Second, to support the charities that are helping women with breast cancer there are thousands of cause products from soup to jewelry to clothes to energy drinks from which a percentage or portion of sales is earmarked for breast cancer (aka Pink) cause. As consumers and donors, we need to be aware of which products appear to say they help a cancer cause and which ones really do.

I love to support breast cancer causes during October. Here are 3 tips to consider before buying a pink product:

Clearly State Which Organization(s) Will Be Receiving Funds

It’s important for me to know which nonprofits will benefit because I don’t support all cancer organizations, and I prefer to support ones that serve my community in Boston. Before buying a cause product, you should know the organization you’re supporting. But you’ll never know unless it’s clearly stated on the product.

Include Info on Where You Can Learn More About the Cause

Give me a web site that I can visit, or, better yet, include a small QR Code on the product to scan so I can get more information. Note to businesses: the more information you give consumers on the cause, the happier we’ll be to support it and to reward you for your generosity. It’s win-win-win. Good the business, the consumer and the cause.

How Much Will the Charity Receive From Purchase

For example, Yoplait tells me that for every yogurt lid I return to them they’ll donate ten cents up to $2.5 million to a breast cancer organization. Again, avoid products with vague language such as “a portion of the proceeds.” There’s another reason I like to know the total amount the company plans to donate: they have to pass my “That’s it?” response. Not all cause products are equally generous. That’s why no information about the donation sings like a little bird: cheap, cheap, cheap.

Not a Waste of Natural Resources

This is a personal preference–and, I admit, kind of quirky–but I generally don’t buy cause products that were manufactured to be, well, cause products. There are literally a bazillion products to buy, so why not use the regular product with some updated packaging? I like it when cause products are closely connected with the things I buy every day.