17 Ways to Ask For Donor Support

Just Ask Fundraising
08.02.2011By

Just Ask FundraisingTo raise money and support for a good cause, you have to ask. In a recent study, Blackbaud looked at the motivation of why people give. 50% of people surveyed said they give because “a friend asked me.” It’s easier said than done, but here are 17 ways to ask someone to donate to your cause:

  1. Host a giving party. Choose a cause, throw a party and ask friends to pay a “cover charge” and donate all proceeds to the cause.
  2. Instead of birthday gifts, ask people to donate to your cause.
  3. Ask a friend to match your donation.
  4. Send a detailed list of your needs to a group of friends and ask how they can contribute.
  5. Instead of holiday gifts (i.e. Christmas, etc.), ask friends and family to donate to a cause.
  6. Getting married? Ask people to contribute to a cause as part of your registry.
  7. Ask a friend to donate and also recruit one more donor to the cause.
  8. Make a video about your cause and why you believe in it. In the video, ask friends and family to donate. Share the video at your next family gathering.
  9. Get adventurous. Set a goal to climb a mountain, run a 5k or face your fear if you meet your fundraising goal. This way you’re asking people to donate–while also asking them to help achieve your goal. It’s a 2 for 1.
  10. Celebrate Halloween? Cause up your costume. Share a fact or two about your cause and ask for a donation in lieu of candy.
  11. If friends can’t give, ask what they can give. Sometimes, people can give smaller amounts in a more frequent basis versus a one-time ask.
  12. Hold a garage sale and donate the profits to a cause. Invite friends and family to attend–and donate items to–the sale.
  13. Host a dinner party. Cook a nice meal and invite all eating to donate the cost of the meal to a cause.
  14. Go canning. In some towns, you can get a permit to go canning. You stand outside of popular restaurants, shops and bars asking people to donate. Personal note: When you do this with a group of friends, it’s extra fun.
  15. Write a handwritten letter to friends and family asking for their support. In an age of expanding email inboxes, a handwritten note goes a long way.
  16. Challenge groups of friends against each other. Make it a competition and see who can raise the most support. Bragging rights go far when it comes to personal relationships.
  17. Engage in social fundraising. On average, people who use social channels raise six times more than those that don’t.

BONUS: There’s more to the picture above. See how Reggie Bibbs has inspired over 6,500 people to “Just Ask” and raise support.

What unique ideas have you used to ask for support? Share them in the comments!

flickr credit:  Neurofibromatosis – Reggie Bibbs